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Books > Greeks in Ancient Pakistan July 7, 2006

Posted by grhomeboy in Books Life, Culture History Mythology.
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Author: Rafi U Samad
Publisher: Indus Publications, 2003
ISBN: 969-529-001-9

The march of Alexander the Great to the territories, which now constitute Pakistan, was an event of great sagnificant not only because of the extraordinary nature of the military expenditure undertaken by one of the worlds greatest conquerors; but also because it was the first time that direct contacts were established between Europe and South Asia.

Alexanders’ march opend up a new era of mutually benificial trade and cultural exchanges between the two regions, more than 4000 kilometers apart.

The fairly intense interaction between ancient South Asia and Greece, which commenced with the marching of Alexander in fourth century BC, continued for almost seven centuries till the middle of 5th century AD. After Alexander it was the Seleucid and Bactrian Greeks settled in West and Central Asia, who continued to interact from across the borders, before the Bactrian/Indus Greeks conquered Gandhara and Punjab in the begining of 1st century BC. The Indus Greeks were succeeded by the philhellenic Scythian, Parthians and Kushans, who continued to rule Ancient Pakistan, till the middle of 5th century AD.

During this extensive period, the nature and extent of Greek involvement and the impact, which the interactions produced in Ancient South Asia and Greece, has been the subject of much controversy. This book incorporates the latest material, which has become available through the research of international scholars. This material has been critically evaluated and supplemented by the author’s own critical analysis of the Hellenistic influences on local art and the influence of eastren Philosophy and religions on the intellectual movments in Greece and elsewhere in Europe.

The book also seeks to identify places and regions mentioned by Alexander’s Generals in their accounts of his military campaigns in the territories, which now constitute Pakistan. It provides latest information on the Alexandrias and the cities founded by the Indus Greeks in this region and on the cantoments and military posts established by Alexander.

Greek philosophy July 7, 2006

Posted by grhomeboy in Culture History Mythology.
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Greek philosophy and spirituality.

One of the many quotes about the Greeks says that Olympians are chosen by the gods. 

And Socrates, said that “with achievement comes honor and with honor, responsibility”.

What do you say? Post your comments!

Historical facts July 7, 2006

Posted by grhomeboy in Culture History Mythology.
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Do you recall the historical Battle of Thermopylae, where 7,000 impassioned Greeks held off 500,000 treacherous Persians for three days?

This is what I call immortal Greek spirit. A legacy and a heritage for us, the modern Greeks.

What do you say? Post your comments!

‘Lysistrata’ brings its sexy spice July 7, 2006

Posted by grhomeboy in Hellenic Light Americas.
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Audiences attending the University of Florida’s production of “Lysistrata” are greeted by an interesting set that suggests the stonework and pillars of the Acropolis.

In case anyone is still in the dark as to the location, the words “The Acropolis” appear across the front of the portico that is center stage and from which emerges the title character, delightfully portrayed by the multi-talented Meg Loftus in ‘Lysistrata’ brings its sexy spice

Her first line, “Where the expletive are the women,” makes it clear that this adaptation of Aristophanes’ nearly 2,500-year-old comedy is not going to be an exercise in subtlety. In fact, this version is more “Deadwood” than Aristophanes. Perhaps it should be.

When the play was first staged, the male characters reportedly wore phalluses and the humor was anything but polite. That spirit has been preserved and delightfully flaunted in this current and encore production, directed by UF professor Judith Williams.

Read the whole of this article > Click above link!

The faceless muse July 7, 2006

Posted by grhomeboy in Hellenic Light Americas.
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The faceless muse in the mural representing Hutchins Street Square has some in the Lodi community abuzz about why she was not finished. The mural, located on Church Street on the north side of the Fitness Pro at Pine Street, is slated to be finished by one of the Wall Dogs artists by the end of the month. But What’s wrong with this picture?

She’s one of 22 ancient Greeks depicted in one of the most elaborate of the nine Wall Dogs murals in Lodi, and her mural is still unfinished, leaving the woman faceless. The painting is located near the intersection of Church and Pine streets, on the side of the Fitness Pro gym, where Anderson works.

The Wall Dogs, a group painters from all over the country, give cities a facelift by creating murals in a particular city every year. Murals often depict the town’s history.

Read the story, view the faceless muse’s pictures > Click above link.

Are History Museums popular? July 7, 2006

Posted by grhomeboy in Culture History Mythology.
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Once I was asked why History Museums have become so popular while Art Museums have not.

Well, here’s what I think >

“My experience has been that the visual arts are seen, not just in the Art Community but in general, as an appendage or amusement. That’s very disappointing to me. We know a lot more about the ancient Greeks or ancient Egyptians through the art that articulated who they are, rather than their businesses or government, those things that are more ephemeral”.

What do you think? Post your comments.

Words of Wisdom July 7, 2006

Posted by grhomeboy in Books Life, Culture History Mythology.
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Here’s Robert Kennedy, in a passage from “A Wonderful Life” reflecting on the death of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.: “Let us dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world. Let us dedicate ourselves to that, and say a  prayer for our country and our people.”

*Cyrus Copeland > He’s back this summer with “A Wonderful Life” a follow-up collection of even more eulogies of departed greats.