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How the Americans favour and promote Turks > II January 13, 2007

Posted by grhomeboy in Cyprus Occupied, Education.
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In an previous post titled “How the Americans favour and promote Turks” dated January 11, 2007 we provided a link to an article appearing at the Voice of San Diego newspaper. The link to the page is this >

http://www.voiceofsandiego.org/articles/2007/01/11/opinion/01goldsdsu.txt

As I am following-up on this article, here are two more additional comments posted by newspaper’s readers, after my personal comment appeared >

Reader Feedback Comments so far on this story:
Nihat wrote on January 12, 2007 10:56 AM:
“Nice article. These hyphenated Americans have no compunction whatsoever in pursuing their pet feuds. March on Yorgos! Continue muddling history, denying responsibility… Who is to hold you back?”

Doug wrote on January 12, 2007 5:11 AM:
“Nice article. I don’t see Turkish-American relations improving if these Greek-Americans keep it up – Nevertheless, Turks always watch them carefully. To all those Cyprus experts out there, remember this word. “Enosis.” The sinister plans of the Greeks back fired and of course now they preach humanity. Those of us who truly understand the history of Cyprus from times way before 1974, will know that it is not as simple as an unjustified Turkish invasion. This issue has always been about Hellenism vs. Turkism. Ethnic cleansing indeed – You Yorgos should get your facts straight!”

and here is my reply to their above comments > 5:55 πμ 13/1/2007

“@ Doug and Nihat > Have you lived in Cyprus? Have you lost any family member during the Turkish invasion? Have you lost your property in the occupied North areas of Cyprus? Have you fought during the invasion? Have you seen dead bodies and have you suffered from the war? Have you seen your friends killed next to you? If not, then you do not know Cyprus history. I suggest to learn about Kissinger’s and the US administration involvement. Enosis was a dream before The Republic of Cyprus was formed in 1960, after British ruled the island.”

Needless to add that I will check again the latest news on this issue and see if my latest, as above, comment was accepted.

UPDATE > 13 January 2007

It seems that above article has sparked a few more comments (in fact two additional ones) plus my last comment again was published uncensored. Read what they had to say:

Reader Feedback Comments so far on this story:

George wrote on January 12, 2007 7:46 PM:
“@ Doug and Nihat > Have you lived in Cyprus? Have you lost any family member during the Turkish invasion? Have you lost your property in the occupied North areas of Cyprus? Have you fought during the invasion? Have you seen dead bodies and have you suffered from the war? Have you seen your friends killed next to you? If not, then you do not know Cyprus history. I suggest to learn about Kissinger’s and the US administration involvement. Enosis was a dream before The Republic of Cyprus was formed in 1960, after British ruled the island.”

Rian wrote on January 12, 2007 7:35 PM:
“It is obvious what side Mr Goldsborough is with? I wonder why…”

John Wilkinson wrote on January 12, 2007 7:32 PM:
“Mr Goldsborough is completely reversing the facts. Is Mr Tsakopoulos politically biased or the university that establishes exchange programmes with Northern Cyprus, a community that has no country status and is not recognised by any country in the world including US, but Turkey? Establishing exchange programmes with N Cyprus is undoubtedly a political statement that affects the international relationships of our country. What would Mr Goldborough say if the university did the same with Cuban or North Korean universities? After all these countries are recognised by the UN. Should universities be involved in international politics?”

Well, that proves something, doesn’t it? People should learn a few historical facts first, and before attempting to make any political or not statements, as well as learn how to sort and separate facts from fiction. A thank you is owed to those readers supporting my facts and certainly not my fiction!

UPDATE >>> 16 January 2007

After my second comment, as stated above, more reader feedback followed, which are as follows:

Reader Feedback Comments so far on this story:
Ergun Kirlikovali wrote on January 14, 2007 1:49 AM:
“Mr Goldsborough hit the nail on the head with his assessment that academic freedom can only be destroyed by political pressure. I was one of the speakers at he ad-hoc committee meeting last December and stunned to see how partisan Tsakopoulos acted. He was asked to recuse himself from the committee due to obvious conflict of interest. After all, he was sitting in judgment of his own proposal (How ugly is that?) The man didn’t care and arrogantly stayed on. Professors, students, and trustees (except the Greek) all supported academic freedom in their speecehes. ”

Nihat wrote on January 14, 2007 1:17 AM:
“@JohnWilkinson> Sir, you’re missing the fact that the said exchange program had the blessings of the State Department. But, you can’t be blamed if you don’t trust the State’s ability to conduct American international affairs properly. @George> It’s not like Turkish Cypriots didn’t lose anything. Were they not killed? Were they not squezed into enclaves and threatened with extinction. Enosis was not a pre-1960 dream; it was a pre-1974 nightmare for Turkish Cypriots. Have you heard of Sampson? I suggest you read some history, too. For a realistic sense of the political situation on the ground, see: http://www.turkishdailynews.com.tr/editorial.php?ed=ariana_ferentinou

JDMB wrote on January 13, 2007 12:31 PM:
“The point of the article is that someone is trying to improperly influence the university’s actions with a sociopolitical agenda, not an educational one. As to the situation in Cyprus: When do we let go of the past? Is Mexico justified in still resenting the loss of Texas due to dubious circumstances (Mexican history of that conflict is different from the US’s)? When should the Irish stop killing each other? Have Argentina & England settled their differences over the Falkland Islands? etc. etc. etc. I am unfamiliar with the Annan Plan but both sides will have to give up something.”

Tom Virane wrote on January 13, 2007 12:10 PM:
“It makes you wonder why Mr Goldsborough has written all these accuracies. If you read carefully the article you will see there is no place for the counterargument. Is this a balanced opinion? Of course not. I wonder how much he is paid by the Turkish embassy. ”

Mike Drake wrote on January 13, 2007 12:42 AM:
“It is perfectly clear to anybody who has studied the Cyprus conflict that Mr. Goldsborough does not have a clue about the reality of the situation. The fact is that 37 percent of the Republic of Cyprus is illegally occupied by Turkey and governed by a puppet regime that the Turkish government supports militarily. Turkish settlers brought to Cyprus are living on land stolen from Greek-Cypriots that were forced to flee from the invading Turkish army in 1974. This illegal entity in the north means that SDSU by fostering this program is complicit in a crime! ”

And here is copy of my reply posted (to appear hopefully by tomorrow) >

Your comment has been posted! 2:45 πμ 16/1/2007
“Academic Freedom is one subject. Military Invasion to The Republic of Cyprus is another. Between the two there’s a thin line Mr Goldsborough did not kept. If Mr Tsakopoulos acted in a provocative manner, must be a reason. You were there you should know better. I have read the article. In 1963 Turks did not accepted  Constitutional change proposed by  President Makarios. They enclaved themselves Christmas 1963. Remember Mansoura and Omorfita bombings? Rauf Denktash forced them to move during 1974s invasion. Sampson was just a puppet.Enosis is a Turkish excuse not for the Greeks. “

I also posted this second comment >

Your comment has been posted! 2:56 πμ 16/1/2007
“Since 100 words are allowed per comment, here is a link for your readers and for all the gentlemen who posted feedback, to read more about the Cyprus Problem >
https://grhomeboy.wordpress.com/tag/news-cyprus-occupied/

Will follow up as usual. And again my sincere thanks to all those Gentlemen who defended my opinion, although I personally know none of them.

UPDATE >>> 16 January 2007, 21:55 local Greek time

The debate goes on. One more feedback from a reader plus my last two comments. Here are the details >

Reader Feedback Comments so far on this story:
John Wilkinson wrote on January 15, 2007 5:44 PM:
“to Nihat: the State Department does not support this officially.. if this is true they are incapable of any serious policy making..OR some in the SD might have their own interests in this story. The fact is that this is a controversial issue that divides us .. the politicians should give an answer to the issue and not the universities.. certainly not the american universities. and it is utterly hypocritical to speak in the name of academic freedom in this country. freedom has nothing to do with personal agendas. ”

George wrote on January 15, 2007 4:56 PM:
“Since 100 words are allowed per comment, here is a link for your readers and for all the gentlemen who posted feedback, to read more about the Cyprus Problem > https://grhomeboy.wordpress.com/tag/news-cyprus-occupied/

George wrote on January 15, 2007 4:45 PM:
“Academic Freedom is one subject. Military Invasion to The Republic of Cyprus is another. Between the two there’s a thin line Mr Goldsborough did not kept. If Mr Tsakopoulos acted in a provocative manner, must be a reason. You were there you should know better. I have read the article. In 1963 Turks did not accepted Constitutional change proposed by President Makarios. They enclaved themselves Christmas 1963. Remember Mansoura and Omorfita bombings? Rauf Denktash forced them to move during 1974s invasion. Sampson was just a puppet.Enosis is a Turkish excuse not for the Greeks. ”

Well, still the debated article’s author has not made any statement nor has posted his opinion or any reaction(s). Not that I was expecting him to do so, maybe he is not aware of the word “Respect”. Or as I read in another reader’s feedback “I wonder how much he is paid by the Turkish embassy.”

In Greece and Cyprus we have a few popular sayings which I find to be most appropriate > “When you hear about a lot of cherries, bring a small basket”, “On the deaf’s door you can knock as long as you want”, “Everyone declares that he/she is what he/she would like to be but is not”. However, popular sayings are indeed unlimited. In the case of Mr Goldsborough, I find them mostly appealing! No hard feelings though 🙂

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