jump to navigation

African abused for six months November 13, 2007

Posted by grhomeboy in Police & Crime.
Tags: ,
comments closed

Three Albanian nationals believed to have raped and tortured an alleged fraudster from Cameroon over a six-month period, in a bid to recoup lost cash, have been arrested while another three are being sought, police in Athens said yesterday.

The six Albanians are alleged to have kidnapped the 32-year-old Cameroon national in April, believing him to belong to a ring of fraudsters that relieved them of 50,000 euros using a scam and fake bank notes.

According to police, the 32-year-old was tied up in a forest in Kapandriti, near Athens, where he was repeatedly beaten and raped until mid-September. The gang members are then alleged to have taken the man to a basement apartment in Kato Patissia, central Athens, where the rape and abuse continued. The victim was subjected to electric shocks and other forms of torture, police said.

In the meantime, ring members contacted his sister, based in Paris, demanding a ransom of 100,000 euros. She alerted authorities who traced the victim after he described to them over the phone what he could see through the window of the flat.

Watchdog against cameras November 2, 2007

Posted by grhomeboy in Police & Crime.
Tags: ,
comments closed

Lawyers and privacy watchdog the Hellenic Data Protection Authority (APPD) expressed their opposition yesterday to a decision by a senior prosecutor to allow police to film violent street protests with traffic cameras, saying the move is non-binding and unnecessary.

On Wednesday, Supreme Court prosecutor Giorgos Sanidas gave police the green light to film protesters and use the footage as court evidence if criminal acts are conducted during the gatherings. The decision allows police to position closed-circuit cameras at public gatherings, such as protest marches and sports events, and then to use any incriminating videotape to identify and prosecute those caught on film committing crimes.

The APPD defended its right to rule against the decison and said that it is not limited by the judiciary. “Our decision is applicable and binding. Any violation is subject to penalties,” it said.

The APPD recently fined police 3,000 euros after finding that 49 of its cameras still do not operate with software that blurs people’s faces. The watchdog also found that images from some of the cameras were also kept for more than seven days, thereby breaking privacy rules.

Meanwhile, lawyers also criticized the decision, saying violent acts can be punished without having to resort to electronic records being kept on demonstrators. “Security and freedom are rights that are compatible,” said Dimitris Paxinos, president of the Athens Bar Association.

The government appears to be in favor of the decision after Justice Minister Sotiris Hatzigakis said there needs to be a balance between personal rights and the interests of society.

Sex in the city > sex crimes November 2, 2007

Posted by grhomeboy in Police & Crime.
Tags: ,
comments closed

Internet crime > A 21-year-old man alleged to have posted erotic photographs of an 18-year-old former girlfriend on the Internet with disparaging comments was yesterday charged with slander and violating personal data. Officers from the Athens electronic crime unit traced the man after the 18-year-old woman, who said she had had a short relationship with the 21-year-old in the past, saw the photos and pressed charges. The man was charged and released pending trial.

Child abuse > A 24-year-old foreign man, accused of raping a 14-year-old boy in his home, was charged yesterday with raping a minor. The man, who was arrested on Wednesday, is also alleged to have sexually molested the boy on two other occasions and given him cash.

Police given approval to use cameras November 1, 2007

Posted by grhomeboy in Police & Crime.
Tags: ,
comments closed

Evidence is admissible in court > Supreme Court prosecutor Giorgos Sanidas yesterday gave police the green light to record street protests with traffic cameras and use the footage as court evidence if criminal acts were committed during the demonstration.

“The protection (of protesters) is understandable only if they demonstrate in a law-abiding manner and not illegally,” said Sanidas.

The decision allows police to position closed-circuit cameras for public gatherings, such as protest marches and sports events, and then to use any incriminating videotape evidence to identify and prosecute those who have committed crimes.

Sanidas clarified however that police do not have the right to confiscate footage from television crews or passers-by for the purpose of using it as evidence in court.

Greece spent some 250 million euros on the surveillance package for the Athens Olympics in 2004, part of which was used to purchase and install some 300 CCTV cameras. But the cameras are not being used due to the intervention of the privacy watchdog, the Hellenic Data Protection Authority (APPD), which recently fined police 3,000 euros after finding that 49 of its cameras were still not operating with software that blurs people’s faces.

The watchdog also found that images from some of the cameras were kept for more than seven days, thereby breaking privacy provisions. Sanidas’s decision comes at a time when police are expecting an increase in street demonstrations due to controversial reforms being prepared by the conservative government in education and the social security system.

Justice Minister Sotiris Hatzigakis said there needs to be a balance between personal rights and the interests of society. “Society’s interests are too big to be sacrificed in the name of individual interests,” he said.

Prostitute tricked into turning tricks October 31, 2007

Posted by grhomeboy in Police & Crime.
Tags: , ,
comments closed

An off-duty border guard tricked a prostitute in Thessaloniki into offering her services free of charge in exchange for a false promise to give her police protection, authorities said yesterday.

Police said the border guard had set up a meeting with the woman over the Internet at a central Thessaloniki hotel and threatened to arrest her as part of a crackdown on illegal prostitution.

Fearing arrest, the woman met his sexual demands, only to be arrested shortly afterward as part of a real vice squad operation.

The woman informed authorities of what she thought was an agreement to avoid arrest and police tracked down the border guard. The suspect will face charges of blackmail in a Thessaloniki misdemeanors court.

Cyprus signs Convention for Children Protection October 31, 2007

Posted by grhomeboy in Cyprus News, Living, Police & Crime.
Tags: , , , , ,
comments closed

The Republic of Cyprus has signed the Convention on the Protection of Children against Sexual Exploitation and Abuse.

The Convention was signed last week by 23 Council of Europe member states, including Austria, Greece, Romania, Serbia, Moldova, Bulgaria and Poland. “The Convention represents a major step in the prevention of sexual offences against children, the prosecution of perpetrators and the protection of victims”, Maud de Boer-Buquicchio, Deputy Secretary General of the Council of Europe, said.

According to a press release by the CoE, for the first time, an international treaty criminalises sexual abuse, an offence which is usually carried out by people known to the victims, sometimes within the family, and is one of the most damaging for children. The convention will enter into force once it has been ratified by five states.

Preventive measures outlined in the convention include the screening, recruitment and training of people working in contact with children, making children aware of the risks and teaching them to protect themselves, as well as monitoring measures for offenders and potential offenders.

The convention establishes programmes to support victims, encourages people to report suspected sexual exploitation and abuse, and sets up telephone and internet helplines for children. It ensures that certain types of conduct are classified as criminal offences, such as engaging in sexual activities with a child below the legal age and child prostitution and pornography.

The convention criminalises the use of the new technologies, the internet in particular, to sexually harm or abuse children, for example by ”grooming”, an increasingly worrying phenomenon of children being sexually harmed after meeting adults they have previously encountered in internet chat rooms or game sites.

With the aim of combating child sex tourism, the convention establishes that individuals can be prosecuted for some offences even when the act is committed abroad. The new legal tool also ensures that child victims are protected during judicial proceedings, for example with regard to their identity and privacy.

Research points to child abuse October 30, 2007

Posted by grhomeboy in Living, Police & Crime.
Tags: , ,
comments closed

More than one in 10 primary school children have been subject to abuse, in some cases sexual, according to the preliminary results of a study carried out by an Athens University professor and made public yesterday by Municipal authorities in Maroussi, northern Athens.

Some 15 percent of children aged between 8 and 12 have been abused, according to the nationwide study carried out by professor Christina Antonopoulou and the child protection agency Hamogelo tou Paidiou (Child’s Smile) on a sample of 2,500 children.

The preliminary results of the study did not indicate who is responsible for abuse against children but Maroussi Mayor Giorgos Tatoulis said, “Usually the aggressor is someone from the child’s familiar environment.” “Every parent should be informed in order to recognize the danger signs,” said Tatoulis, the director of an intermunicipal initiative to boost health services. “Lack of infrastructure means children often don’t get psychiatric tests to determine whether they have been abused or not,” he said.